Tending to Herbs in Your Home or Garden

Plenty of avid gardeners enjoy nothing more than growing their own herbs and with the comfortable climate that’s present within Melbourne for over half the year – these types of plants can be nurtured well into the future. One of the most appealing things about growing herbs is that you can typically do so in your own home as well as in a soil bed.

The main thing to consider is that herbs thrive in cooler, moist environments. This can be said for well over 80% of herbs – allowing you to occupy a shelf with your favourite species without having to worry too much about whether they will grow or not. This is also one of the main reasons why many people opt to use greenhouses to plant their herb seeds; simply due to the fact that an internal environment can actually be very beneficial to these types of plants.

What will you need to grow a plant indoors?

Generally speaking, you’ll require a pot, fresh soil, the seeds, or the young herb itself and access to natural light. Although the sun’s rays are responsible for encouraging flowers and trees to grow, it’s actually the environment that plays more of a role when it comes to herbs. As a result, direct sunlight isn’t a necessity, allowing gardeners to place their pots on a shelf near a garden or outdoor space and then rest assured that their herb will be receiving the relevant nutrition from reflections and surroundings.

And what about outside?

If you are planning on growing common herbs outdoors including mint and parsley, then shade is a must. These types of herbs will struggle to remain hydrated if left in direct sunlight, so it’s never a good idea to place them anywhere that receives higher volumes of UV rays. Instead, a dedicated soil bed alongside a tree, or near a fence can provide ample coverage. On the other side of the coin, certain species such as lavender can thrive in the sun – as can spring onions (or scallions), chives and basil.

How important is hydration?

One commonality shared between the majority of herbs is their need for fresh hydration – although it’s important to note that too much can result in over-watering and can lead to drowning. To avoid this, always base your watering practices in a manner that’s dependant on the temperature. In hotter climates with low humidity, water will evaporate far more quickly, so watering at least three times a week should be a priority. When higher humidity is present however, this means that there is more water in the air, so soil can be kept damp with just one or two weekly waters.